Is there an operation to cure urinary tract infections

Therapy of a urinary tract infection

An uncomplicated inflammation of the lower urinary tract can be treated well and heals without consequences if treated in good time. But even ascending urinary tract infections with involvement of the kidneys usually do not cause any permanent damage if given timely, professional therapy.

Short version:

  • The treatment of an uncomplicated urinary tract infection is usually antibiotic.
  • After taking antibiotics, the inflammation subsides within a few days.
  • In addition to antibiotics, pain relievers or anticonvulsant medication can also be used.

When does a cystitis need medical treatment?

Cystitis often requires medical treatment. If urination is accompanied by pain or burning sensation, if the urine can only be passed in spurts, if there is blood in it or if there are severe abdominal pain, a doctor's visit is recommended. If left untreated, a harmless cystitis can develop into pyelonephritis (inflammation of the kidney pelvis).

+++ More on the topic: How is a urinary tract infection diagnosed? +++

How is a urinary tract infection treated?

An uncomplicated inflammation of the lower urinary tract can be treated well and heals without consequences with timely therapy. However, the disease has a tendency to recur and can even become chronically recurrent. But even ascending urinary tract infections with involvement of the kidneys usually do not result in permanent damage if the treatment is given in good time.

Uncomplicated cystitis is usually treated with antibiotics. Although 30–50% of uncomplicated urinary tract infections heal spontaneously and without complications, oral antibiotic therapy is recommended to allow the unpleasant clinical symptoms to subside more quickly and to completely eliminate the pathogens.

After taking antibiotics, the inflammation subsides within a few days. The treating doctor decides on the selection of a suitable antibiotic (double shot, 3-day or 7-day therapy). The administration of a pain reliever or an anticonvulsant medication is recommended as a supportive therapy or as the sole therapy for a mild course.

In the case of pregnant women, diabetics, people with a weak immune system and children, the choice of therapy is adapted to the circumstances.

Does drinking a lot help with a urinary tract infection?

Since most pathogens adhere to the bladder wall, they cannot be "rinsed out". Rather, the body's own defense system is heavily diluted by the high fluid absorption in the urine and therefore cannot develop its full effect.

In the case of severe pelvic pain, drinking large amounts of water leads to relief, as the diluted urine contains less potassium. As a result, the pain fibers in the bladder are no longer activated as strongly. So if you are in severe pain, you should drink a lot, but be aware that the defense against germs will no longer work as well.

So how much is it "healthy" to drink?

There is a simple rule for how much you drink: listen to your body! When are we eating? When we are hungry. So we should also drink when we are thirsty. The often repeated statement "If you are thirsty, then it is already too late" is scientifically complete nonsense. On the contrary: Studies have even shown in top-class sport that athletes perform better if they only drink when they feel thirsty. Because a healthy person (without a brain disease) already feels thirsty in the body with a fluid deficiency of 200 ml.

If you don't want to trust your own body and absolutely need numbers to feel safe: 1,500–2,000 ml urine excretion per day is normal. On some days you can do this with one liter drunk, on others with four liters. It is important that the bladder takes up a maximum of 450–500 ml, otherwise it will be overstretched and the function of the bladder muscles will be disturbed.

In fact, one sees more and more young women who have overstretched their bladder with excessive drinking to such an extent that it can no longer contract properly. This bladder dysfunction, triggered by polyuria (increased urge to urinate) in the case of polydipsia (pathological increased thirst), is now increasingly becoming a reason for recurring urinary tract infections.

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Authors:
Astrid Leitner
Medical review:
Dr. Erik Randall Huber, FEBU, FECSM (2016)
Editorial editing:
Nicole Kolisch

Status of medical information:

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ICD-10: N30